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So good

Spencer Albee's got Spirit. How 'bout you?
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  July 30, 2009

Vision main

SWEET AND SILLY Spencer and the School Spirit Mafia. CREDIT ROBBIE KANNER | VISION FOR VIEWERS

One way to experiment with songwriting is to throw convention out the window, eschew verses and choruses, try to be completely unique. Sometimes the idea appears that if a song sounds like anything that came before it, well, that's points deducted like a gymnast who missed her landing. It's derivative!

When Spencer Albee experiments with songwriting, he buries himself ever deeper in the "rules" of songwriting and elbows around and mucks things up within the confines of the box he's purposely built around himself. He likes the way songs have traditionally been written. You do, too. Your brain is hardwired to like the way songs have traditionally been written. Part of Albee's appeal is that his songs sound like the songs you love by the Beach Boys, the Beatles, and Bad Company, but (sometimes just a little bit) not. It's derivative!

On Albee's newest project, Candy, Cake, and Ice Cream, by Spencer and the School Spirit Mafia (generally written, recorded, and performed by Albee; released by Mark Curdo's Labor Day Records), he is not just as free and easy with his pop/rock roots as he's ever been, but — fittingly for a band he basically slapped together to play SPACE's Homecoming Dance party last September — he is as free and easy, in general, as he's ever been.

Of the now seven albums Albee has fronted, this is the first time I've truly believed him since I first heard the Popsicko album in 2001.

He's a kid at heart, if a sort of manic and scruffy one, and that kid is desperate for it to be okay to have fun, for it to be okay to want things to be "So Good," with no apologies or cynical posturing. Let's sing along. Let's dance. Let's eat candy, cake, and ice cream and give each other presents and live life in Technicolor, for God's sake.

So Albee's taken that "So Good" song As Fast As contributed to Greetings From Area Code 207, Vol. 6 (November 2005) and built an album around it, if only because he could. Opening with an "I Love You! Good Morning!" that references the first Rocktopus album in title and "So Good" with a melody line played by Tim Emery (the McCarthys) on sitar, the album proceeds to ramble and jangle through loves lost and found, life lessons and aphorisms, and a fuck-all aesthetic.

"And I start to sing a song I thought no one could hear/But you knew all the words/And you start to sing along/Because there ain't nobody here/It's you and I, so good."

It's as pretty a duet as you've heard (equal to Albee's turn with Darien Brahms in his Frankenstein days), stripped down and made acoustic, with none of the pure-pop punch of the original version. But who's that he's singing with? Oh, it's his sister, Katherine Albee, and isn't that perfectly innocent and sweet, and not even in a saccharine or Pixy Stix kind of way? Yeah, it really is.

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  Topics: CD Reviews , Culture and Lifestyle, Food and Cooking, Brian Wilson (Musician),  More more >
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